Physiotherapist Kairomiromi

Physiotherapists work to maintain and promote people's health. They help restore function and independence when people have a disability or problem caused by physical, brain and nervous system disorders.

Physiotherapists may do some or all of the following:

  • assess and diagnose patients' injuries or functional problems and decide on treatment
  • use a range of treatments to reduce pain and improve movement
  • plan exercises for patients to improve their strength and fitness
  • keep records of patients' progress
  • educate people on how to prevent further injury
  • help rehabilitate people who have suffered from strokes or accidents
  • educate caregivers and family about the patient's physiotherapy programme.

To specialise in a particular area of physiotherapy you need to complete:

  • a portfolio assessment
  • a practical clinical assessment
  • a panel review with The New Zealand Physiotherapy Board. 

Physical Requirements

Physiotherapists need to be reasonably fit and healthy.

Useful Experience

Useful experience for physiotherapists includes:

  • work as a nurse aide or physiotherapy assistant
  • occupational health nursing
  • counselling experience
  • other work in the health sector.

Personal Qualities

Physiotherapists need to be:

  • supportive and positive
  • able to gain people's trust and work with a team
  • good listeners and communicators
  • understanding of diverse cultures
  • good at planning and organising.

Useful Experience

Useful experience for physiotherapists includes:

  • work as a nurse aide or physiotherapy assistant
  • occupational health nursing
  • counselling experience
  • other work in the health sector.

Subject Recommendations

NCEA Level 3 is required to enter tertiary training. Useful subjects include physical education, health, biology, chemistry and physics.

Physiotherapists can earn around $47K-$68K per year per year.

Chances of getting a job as a Physiotherapist are good due to a shortage of people interested in this type of work.

Physiotherapists can move into teaching and research roles, progress into management positions, or set up their own clinics.

Physiotherapists may specialise in a specific area of physiotherapy, such as:

  • Cardiorespiratory

  • Continence and Women's Health

  • Hand Therapy

  • Musculoskeletal

  • Neurology

  • Occupational Health

  • Older Adults

  • Paediatrics

  • Pain management

  • Sports.

 

Physiotherapist